Thursday, October 11, 2012

Eggs with Cheese

6 eggs. 2 heaping tablespoonfuls Parmesan cheese. 1/2 teaspoonful salt. Pinch of red pepper.
Beat the eggs without separating till light and foamy, and then add the cheese, salt, and pepper. Put a tablespoonful of butter in the frying-pan, and when it is hot put in the eggs, and stir till smooth and firm. Serve on small pieces of buttered toast.
Parmesan cheese is very nice to use in cooking; it comes in bottles, all ready grated to use.

Eggs Baked in Little Dishes

Margaret's mother had some pretty little dishes with handles, brown on the outside and white inside. These Margaret buttered, and put one egg in each, sprinkling with salt, pepper, and butter, with a little parsley. She put the dishes in the oven till the eggs were firm, and served them in the small dishes, one on each plate.

Omelette with Mushrooms and Olives

This was a very delicious dish, and Margaret only made it for company. She prepared the mushrooms just as in the rule above, and added twelve olives, cut into small pieces, and spread the omelette with the whole when she turned it.

Omelette with Mushrooms

Take a can of mushrooms and slice half of them into thin pieces. Make a cup of very rich white sauce, using cream instead of milk, and cook the mushrooms in it for one minute. Make the omelette as before, and spread with the sauce when you turn it over.

Spanish Omelette

1 cup of cooked tomato. 1 green pepper. 1 slice of onion. 1 teaspoonful of chopped parsley. 1 teaspoonful salt. 3 shakes of pepper.
Cut the green pepper in half and take out all the seeds; mix with the tomato, and cook all together with the seasoning for five minutes. Make an omelette by the last rule while the tomato is cooking, and when it is done, just before you fold it over, put in the tomato.

Omelette

Making an omelette seems rather a difficult thing for a little girl, but Margaret made hers in a very easy way. Her rule said:
Break four eggs separately. Beat the whites till they are stiff, and then wash and wipe dry the egg-beater, and beat the yolks till they foam, and then put in half a teaspoonful of salt. Pour the yolks over the whites, and mix gently with a large spoon. Have a cake-griddle hot, with a piece of butter melted on it and spread over the whole surface; pour the eggs on and let them cook for a moment. The take a cake-turner and slip under an edge, and look to see if the middle is getting brown, because the color comes there first. When it is a nice even color, slip the turner well under, and turn the omelette half over, covering one part with the other, and then slip the whole off on a hot platter. Bridget had to show Margaret how to manage this the first time, but after that she could do it alone.

Birds' Nests

Sometimes when she wanted something very pretty for breakfast,
Margaret used this rule:
Open six eggs, putting the whites together in one large bowl, and the yolks in six cups on the kitchen table. Beat the whites till they are stiff, putting in half a teaspoonful of salt just at the last. Divide the whites, putting them into six patty-pans, or small baking-dishes. Make a little hole or nest in the middle of each, and slip one yolk carefully from the cup into the place. Sprinkle a little salt and pepper over them, and put a bit of butter on top, and put the dishes into a pan and set in the oven till the egg-whites are a little brown.

Creamed Eggs in Baking-Dishes

Cut six hard-boiled eggs up into bits, mix with a cup of white sauce, and put in small baking-dishes which you have buttered. Cover over with fine, sifted bread-crumbs, and dot with bits of butter, about four to each dish, and brown in the oven. Stick a bit of parsley in the top of each, and put each dish on a plate, to serve.

Creamed Eggs

Cook six eggs twenty minutes, and while they are on the fire make a cup of white sauce, as before: one tablespoonful of butter, melted, one of flour, one cup of hot milk, a little salt; cook till smooth. Peel the eggs and cut the whites into pieces as large as the tip of your finger, and put the yolks through the potato-ricer. Mix the eggs white with the sauce, and put in a hot dish, with the yellow yolks over the top. Or, put the whites on pieces of toast, which you have dipped in part of the white sauce, and put the yolks on top, and serve on a small platter.
Another nice way to cream eggs is this: Cook them till hard, and cut them all up into bits. Make the white sauce, and into it stir the beaten yolk of one egg, just after taking it from the fire. Mix the eggs with this, and put in a hot dish or on toast. You can sprinkle grated cheese over this sometimes, for a change.

Scrambled Eggs with Chicken

Chop fine a cup of cold chicken, or any light-colored meat, and heat it with a tablespoonful of water, a half-teaspoonful of salt, two shakes of pepper, and a teaspoonful of chopped parsley. Cook a half-teaspoonful of minced onion in the butter you put in the hot frying-pan, and turn in the eggs, and when they set mix in the chicken.

Sometimes Margaret used both the tomato filling and the chicken in the eggs, when she wanted to make a large dish.

Scrambled Eggs with Tomato

When Margaret found a cupful of tomato in the refrigerator, she would take that, add a half-teaspoonful of salt, two shakes of pepper, and a teaspoonful of chopped parsley, and simmer it all on the fire for five minutes; then she would cook half a teaspoonful of minced onion in the butter in the hot frying-pan as before, and turn in the eggs, and when they were beginning to grow firm, put in the tomato. In summer-time she often cut up two fresh tomatoes and stewed them down to a cupful, instead of using the canned.

Scrambled Eggs with Parsley

Chop enough parsley to make a teaspoonful, and mince half as much onion. Put the onion in the butter when you heat the pan, and cook the eggs in it; when you are nearly ready to take the eggs off the fire, put in the parsley. After Margaret had learned to make these perfectly, she began to mix other things with the eggs.

Poached Eggs with Potted Ham

Make the rounds of toast and poach the eggs as before. Make a white sauce in this way: melt a tablespoonful of butter, and when it bubbles put in a tablespoonful of flour; shake well, and add a cup of hot milk and a small half-teaspoonful of salt; cook till smooth. Moisten each round of toast with a very little boiling water, and spread with some of the potted ham which comes in little tin cans; lay a poached egg on each round, and put a teaspoonful of white sauce on each egg.

If you have no potted ham in the house, but have plain boiled ham, put this through the meat-chopper till you have half a cupful, put in a heaping teaspoonful of the sauce, a saltspoonful of dry mustard, and a pinch of red pepper, and it will do just as well.

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